What Happened Before History?

Want an interesting ten minute video that’ll frame your day in a different light? Human history is on today’s menu…

Exponential acceleration of development is on fine display throughout human history.

Fascinating Way To Save The Bees

The renowned mycologist and genius discoverer of immunological and bioremedial properties of mushrooms Paul Stamets unveils his latest breakthrough research.

This speech was given at the 2014 Bioneers Annual Conference.

Ideas Are Like Boogers

 

Some stick. Some don’t.

There are big ones and small ones.

They often arise in spurts.

Some people are overrun by them and accomplish nothing. Others never seem to get one.

If you look for one too hard where there are none, you’ll bleed.

Sometimes they attack in the middle of the night.

You can appreciate a friend’s, but you can’t really share it.

Polite society avoids them.

Kids who have them get noticed.

Ignoring one won’t make it go away, no matter how hard you try.

Each one is unique.

If you launch it right, it can take on a life of its own.

Good ones can be shared – to the astonishment of all.

New ones aren’t necessarily better than old ones.  They’re just newer.

Old ones aren’t necessarily better than new ones.  They’re just older.

They come less often in summer.

It used to be a boy thing, but by now folks realize that girls get them too.

Not all are worth digesting.

Few are worth buying.

Timing is key.

Like it or not, your Mom’s and Dad’s aren’t that different from your own.

If you’re lucky, yours will outlive you.

You can put one in a book.

Even those worth disregarding are free and often harmless.

A trek through nature can inspire really big ones.

Big ones that won’t quite arrive are frustrating.

Alone, they cannot feed you.

They are common to people living in every corner of the Earth, with surprisingly little variation.

Imagine what would happen if a million people all used theirs in a coordinated movement.

They are shaped by you.

They can be used to feed plants.

When you have a big one, celebrate it.  Look at it closely from all angles.  Laugh at it.  Then decide what to do with it.

Just because a role model gave you one, doesn’t mean you have to keep it.

 

— — —

 

When is the last time you had one of epic proportion?  What did you do with it?

What will you do with your next good one?

 

How To Build a Time Machine

Wondering about your options for building a time machine? According to Dr. Ronald Mallett, you actually do have some:

Inspired by the book, “The Time Machine” by H.G. Wells as a boy, Dr. Mallett has spent years thinking about the issues involved. I’d be shocked beyond measure if a working time machine was available at the local gadget store within our lifetime, but this speech gives some food for thought.

A second book also inspired the speaker: “The Universe of Dr. Einstein.” This book allowed the young man to realize that according to Einstein, time has some flexibility.

How To Build a Time Machine, According to Sneezl

Building from the principle that objects at high speeds experience time at a slower rate, here is a guide to building your own time machine:

  1. Build a machine that goes unbelievably fast
  2. While going unbelievably fast, do not die
  3. Slow down
  4. Join the future

Of course, there are critical problems with this plan, but if you really want a time machine…

(kids: talk to your parents before trying anything…)

How To Build a Time Machine, Option 2

This time machine won’t be as dramatic as the previous suggestion, but here goes:

  1. No matter where you are, be as high off the ground as possible:
    • Sleeping? Choose the top bunk
    • Apartment shopping? Choose the top floor
    • Eating? Find a roof-top patio
    • Not sure where to live? Move to Nepal
  2. As the Earth rotates, you will constantly be moving slightly faster than everyone at ground level.
  3. You will be experiencing time a little slower than everyone else.

If all goes well, you’ll add a second or two to your lifetime 🙂

Why Are Humans So Brainy?

Scientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel is a neuroscientist at the Institute of Biomedical Sciences in Rio de Janeiro. In this TED talk, she explores human brains in search of answers to puzzling questions about humanity.

Here is her talk:

Suzana developed her own way to count the number of neurons within a brain. She calls it “brain soup.” It’s a simple and fast way to analyze and compare the brains of various species.

A few highlight facts:

  • a brain’s size and the number of neurons are often not related
  • the human brain has on average 86 billion neurons
  • 16 billion of these human neurons are in the cerebral cortex
  • no other species (rodent, primate, etc.) yet studied has so many neurons in its cerebral cortex

The connections between diet and brain potential are fascinating.

Fun stuff! I think I need a sandwich 🙂