Structured Silver Uses

The info below gives guidance for using structured silver.

The source of these tips and application methods is the book “A New Fighting Chance” by Dr. Pedersen, pages 35 to 39.


General Uses for Body Systems

Structured silver may be your most effective tool to maintain, sustain and support your immune defenses.  This chapter provides basic guidelines for appropriate application of structured silver depending on how it is being used.  More detailed information on specific health challenges is given in a later chapter.

An important question to ask with your healthcare professional is, “if there are pathogens in the body that structured silver can kill on contact, how do I get the right amount of silver to specific locations around the body?” This is basically a question of delivery.  Since the body is complex, different delivery strategies are needed for different parts of the body and for different infections.

Here are several recommendations, organized by body system.

General Usage:
•       Maintenance dose: 2 teaspoons, hold under tongue for 30 seconds then swallow, twice a day
•       Acute Immune Issue: 2 tablespoons 2-3 times a day

Respiratory System:
•       Respiratory Health: Swallow two teaspoons twice daily and spray 3-4 sprays in nose as needed.
•       Nasal Health / Allergies: Swallow 2 teaspoons twice daily and spray into the nose 3-4 sprays 4 times a day.
•       Mouth and Gum Health: Twice daily, hold 2 tablespoons in mouth and gargle for 4-5 minutes, then swallow.
•       Throat Health: Hold 2 tablespoons in mouth for 3 minutes then swallow; repeat several times a day.  If using spray, 15 sprays every other hour.
•       Lung Health: Swallow 2 tablespoons 2-3 times a day, and inhale 4 sprays four times a day.

Cardiovascular Health:
•       2 tablespoons, hold in mouth for 1 minute, then swallow, twice a day.

Digestive / Intestinal System:
•       Gastrointestinal Health: Swallow two teaspoons twice daily.
•       Intestinal Health Balance: Take 2 tablespoons of silver 2-3 times a day and combine with probiotics twice a day.

Urinary System:
•       Drink 2 tablespoons twice daily.

Female Specific:
•       Female Health: Use two to three ounces in affected area, hold for ten minutes then release, 1-2 times daily.  And drink 2 tablespoons twice daily.

Sensory System:
•       Ear Health: Point ear towards the sky and put 5 drops into ear and hold upright for 10 minutes.  Repeat every 12 hours.  And swallow 2 teaspoons twice daily.
•       Eye Health: Use 1-2 drops every hour.

Immune / Allergy Health:
•       Nasal Health / Allergies: Swallow 2 teaspoons twice daily and spray into the nose 3-4 sprays 1-4 times a day.

First Aid Recovery Support for Cuts, Scrapes, Bug Bites, etc.:
•       To support the immune system, swallow 2 teaspoons twice a day and apply gel topically as needed.

Skin and Nails:
•       Skin Health: To support the immune system, apply gel twice daily or as needed, and swallow liquid 2 teaspoons twice daily.
•       Nail Fungus: Frequent use of small amounts of product is best.

Healthy Water:
•       2 tablespoons per gallon of water, wait 4 minutes, drink as needed.

Traveling:
•       Swallow 2 teaspoons before, during and after flying or driving, for general immune support.  Hold under tongue for 30 seconds before swallowing.  And spray.
•       3-4 sprays into nose before flying.

Please be aware that federal regulations limit dietary supplements to oral administration even if structure function claims may be specific to certain body parts.

Note: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.  This product is not intended to cure, treat, diagnose or prevent any disease.


Immune System

Structured silver is a mild immune modulator.  It has been shown to cause an increase in the number and activity of immune cells when taken orally.  This means that if you drink a teaspoon of silver liquid twice daily you will find an increase in the number of white blood cells, which destroy foreign pathogens in the body.  It should be noted that this improvement in immune health occurs within an hour after drinking silver and will last for approximately 24-48 hours after.  You can expect to have improved defenses against bacteria viruses and yeast during the time you are taking a structured silver and for a day or two after.  In addition silver can help protect and shield the body from diseases caused by these pathogens by killing them upon direct contact.

Recommendations:
Drink one teaspoon 2 times daily to support immune function, and apply a pH-balanced silver gel as needed to affected areas that require gel application.  Benefits can be measured in the blood within one hour and will last up to two days after the last drink.  Benefits from the gel can be felt in 3-5 minutes as it helps reduce pain and inflammation.  For more serious health concerns silver liquid can be taken 2-4 times greater doses.

Respiratory System

Structured silver destroys bacteria viruses and yeast that resides in or around the respiratory system (ears, nose, throat, lungs).

Recommendations:
•       Inhaled (from a nebulizer 30 minutes a day or two episodes of 15 minutes each).
•       Drink two teaspoons twice a day, or spray fine mist up nose 2-5 times a day.
•       Apply gel to the nose, sinuses mouth, and hands to prevent infections or spread of germs.  This can be done 1-5 times a day or as often as it keeps the nasal passages moist.

Reproductive System

Silver benefits the reproductive organs by destroying bacteria, viruses and yeast that may cause damage to the delicate organs and tissues of the reproductive system.  Silver destroys bacteria that cause urinary tract infections and yeast that causes yeast infections.  This can be accomplished in about ten minutes as long as the silver comes in close proximity to the germs.

Recommendations:
•       Drink liquid silver two teaspoons twice a day to help destroy germs from the inside out.
•       Apply silver gel to the reproductive tissues that are susceptible to infections (vagina, penis, foreskin, breast, pubic hair etc.).  This should be done twice a day or more often if needed.
•       Apply the silver gel to a tampon and insert for 90 minutes in order to stay in contact with germs intravaginally.
•       Apply the gel twice a day to the foreskin, condom or genitals to protect yourself or your sex partner.

Circulatory System

Structured silver destroys the bacterium that causes cardiovascular diseases.  The gel can be used as toothpaste to kill the bacteria that causes bad breath, cavities, abscesses, and heart disease because this kind of bacteria resides in the gums.  A mouthwash twice a day will kill bacteria in the mouth as well.

Digestive System

Silver liquid and gel can be swallowed and enter the digestive tract where it will destroy bacteria, viruses and yeast.  There are serious diseases that originate in the intestines, colon, and vital organs of digestion.  Silver can pass through the digestive tract unchanged.  This means the silver kills germs in the kidneys and bladder just as effectively as it kills bacteria in the mouth.  This is significant because kidney, liver and bladder infections are very difficult to control but silver will pass through the bloodstream and flow through the liver, thus cleansing the germs out of the liver, then pass through the kidneys and on to the bladder where pathogens will be destroyed when they come in close proximity with the silver nanoparticles.

Recommendations:

•       Drink two teaspoons of silver liquid twice daily for digestive health.  In the event there is a food poisoning, diarrhea, or other digestive malady, silver liquid can be swallowed one ounce every hour for 12 hours or until remedied.  Usually the most serious symptoms of the food poisoning problem can be brought under control in 2-4 hours with the remainder of the sickness requiring maintenance doses (two teaspoons twice daily).
•       Apply the gel to any orifice of the body that may need protection from germs (1-4 times a day).

Hair Skin and Nails

Structured silver liquid and gel destroys the bacteria, viruses and yeast that cause diseases in the hair, skin and nails.  The liquid can be used in shampoo, lotions, gels, and moisturizers and under nails.  The gel can be applied to all skin conditions and can be pushed under nails to destroy yeast.

Recommendations:
•       All of these can benefit from drinking structured silver liquid two teaspoons twice a day and applying the gel 2-4 times a day or as needed topically.

Robert Moog Music – Research Hub

Robert A. Moog made some kickin’ awesome instruments.

“Bob” Moog (1934-2005) left a legacy that includes some of the 20th Century’s most adventurous new musical instruments. His pioneering work helped pave the way to today’s vibrant musical landscape.

Moog was a pioneer of electronic instruments, but he still saw live music as “the most important aspect of music.” Here is a quote from “MOOG – A Documentary”, PART 3, 15:05:

What’s been happening over the last several decades is that music is becoming more and more something that producers do by themselves for listeners who listen by themselves.

Whereas if you go back, say before electronics, music is always something that was done by musicians and listeners being together and interacting.

I think that kind of interaction is the most important aspect of music, culturally. – Robert A. Moog


This post is for people interested in learning more about Dr. Moog, his music, his instruments, and the items that he wrote. This post does not include the resources he made themselves, but rather it points towards the most interesting resources a person could hope to find as a part of their research in bibliographic form.

Resources are listed in eleven categories:

  1. Robert A. Moog’s Biography
  2. Articles about Moog within the Context of Synthesizers and Smart-Pop Music
  3. Specific Moog Instruments
  4. General and Custom Synthesizers
  5. Miscellaneous
  6. Robert Moog as Author (Stuff he wrote)
  7. Other Productions Involving Moog as a Contributor
  8. Recordings – Moog as Musician, Composer, Liner-Note-Writer, or Contributor
  9. Recordings – Moog Otherwise Involved
  10. Recordings – Incomplete List of Recordings Using Moog Instruments
  11. Sales, Repair, Upgrades, and Maintenance of Moog Products

Biography

Moog Archives. Available from http://moogarchives.com/. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers a collection of documents, photographs, and memorabilia from the Moog’s various manufacturing companies, including a detailed chronology from 1953 – 1993.

Raymond Scott. Available from http://raymondscott.com/#bob-moog.

This website includes written material by Robert Moog and Raymond Scott, each writing about the other synthesizer designer. There are interesting anecdotes and biographical details.

Synthmuseum.com – Moog. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/index.html. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website provides biographical information on Robert Moog, quotations about how he became involved in synthesizer design, quotations about his collaboration with Wendy Carlos, and quotations about the development of his business.

General Writings About Robert Moog Within the Context of Synthesizer Developments and the Smart-Pop Music Scene

Buchner, Alexander. “Elektronicke hudebni nastroje z hlediska historie.” Hudebni nastroje, Czechoslovakia 17, no. 1 (1980): 29-30.

This article discusses the unlimited possibilities presented by today’s music technology, which is shown to be related to the development of musical instruments. This is part one of a two part article. [RILM: 80-01743-ap]

Buchner, Alexander. “Elektronicke hudebni nastroje z hlediska historie.” Hudebni nastroje, Czechoslovakia 17, no. 2 (1980): 50-51.

Part two of this two part article discusses specific electronic instruments, including the Moog synthesizer in 1965. [RILM: 80-01743-ap]

Chadabe, Joel. Electric Sound: The Past and Promise of Electronic Music. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1997.

This book centres on the history and development of electronic music from the early twentieth century until 1997, including prominent inventors, instruments, and composers. Robert Moog and his work in the 1960s with computer systems and synthesizers are included. [RILM: 97-14309-bm]

Darter, Tom, ed. Contemporary Keyboard, I.

This bi-monthly magazine, new in 1976, featured articles about and interviews with keyboard performers in all styles of music. The first issue includes material about Robert A. Moog. [RILM: 76-08611-bp]

Humpert, Hans Ulrich. “Was ist und wie funktioniert ein Synthesizer?” Melos 40, no. 4 (1973): 207-14.

This article covers the basic function and technical theory of an analogue synthesizer, such as the synthesizers of R.A. Moog. [RILM: 75-02539-ap]

Kuhnelt, Wolf D. “Elektroakustische Musikinstrumente.” In Fur Augen und Ohren, 46-73. Berlin: Akademie der Kunste, 1980.

This German article presents a brief history of electro-acoustic instruments from the telephone to the year 1980, including the instruments of Robert Moog. [RILM: 80-05553-as]

Powers, Ollie D. “Interactions Between Composers and Technology in the First Decades of Electronic Music, 1948-1968.” D.A. diss., Ball State University, 1997.

Ollie Powers discusses the connections between active composers from 1948-1968 using electronic instruments and the realities of those instruments’ and electronic systems’ limitations. Many electronic devices are considered, including the voltage controlled (analogue) synthesizers of Robert Moog. [RILM: 97-14372-dd]

Instruments

Specific Moog Synthesizers

* The annotations for all instrumental citations beginning with Harmony Central, Sonicstate.com, and Synthmuseum.com have been combined into corporate annotations and are placed at the end of this section.

CONCERTMATE MG-1:

Harmony Central – Moog MG-1 Concertmate. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/MG-1-Concertmate-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Concertmate MG-1. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moogrealistic.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Concertmate MG-1. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/rad/radmg101.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

CDX:

Synthmuseum.com – Moog CDX. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moogorg01.html. Accessed 5 December 2002.

LIBERATION:

Harmony Central – Moog Liberation. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Libetation-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Liberation. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_liberation.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Moog Liberation. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moolib01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002.

MEMORYMOOG:

Harmony Central – Moog MemoryMoog. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/MemoryMoog-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Harmony Central – Moog MemoryMoog LAMM . Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/MemoryMoog-LAMM-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Harmony Central – Moog MemoryMoog+. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/MemoryMoog–01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

MemoryMoog Library. Available from http://www.retrosynth.com/docs/memorymoog/. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers online user manuals, service manuals, schematics, retrofit procedures, tuning tips, and more for the MemoryMoog.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Lintronic Advanced MemoryMoog. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_lintronicadnaced.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> MemoryMoog. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_memorymoog.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Memorymoog. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moomem01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

MG-01:

Harmony Central – Moog MG-01. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/MG-01-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

MICROMOOG:

Harmony Central – Moog MicroMoog. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/MicroMoog-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Micromoog. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_micro.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Micromoog . Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moomicro01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

MINIMOOG:

Harmony Central – Moog Minimoog. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Minimoog-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Harmony Central – Moog Minimoog Voyager. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Minimoog-Voyager-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Intermusic.com – Moog MiniMoog. Available from http://www.intermusic.com/article.asp?ReviewId=130&ArticleTable=Reviews&SubCat=13&Channel=KBD&PageNo=1. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers a lengthy review of the Moog MiniMoog, focusing on the instrument’s history and features.

Minimoog Site, The. Available from http://www.geocities.com/moogbros/minisite.html. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers multiple .jpg images of historic advertisements for the Minimoog. The site is currently under construction, but hopes to offer a comprehensive set of images and information related to this instrument.

Minimoog, The. Available from http://www.enteract.com/~mghall/moog/minimoog.html. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers technical data and downloadable operation and service manuals for the MiniMoog.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Minimoog. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moogmini.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Minimoog Voyager. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_voyager.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Minimoog. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moomini01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

Synrise. Available from http://www.synrise.de/html/minimoog.htm. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This German website offers information on the various models of MiniMoog, making distinctions between models A, B, C, Classic, D, E, Expander, F, and MIDI.

MINITMOOG:

Harmony Central – Moog Minitmoog. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Minitmoog-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Minitmoog. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moominit01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

MODULAR MOOGS:

Synthmuseum.com – Modular Moogs. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moomod.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

MULTIMOOG:

Harmony Central – Moog Multimoog. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Multimoog-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Multimoog. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_multimoog.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Multimoog. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moomulti01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

OPUS-3:

Harmony Central – Moog Opus III. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Opus-III-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Opus 3. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_opus3.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Opus 3. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/mooopus301.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

POLYMOOG:

Harmony Central – Polymoog. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Polymoog-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Polymoog Synthesizer. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_polymoog.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Polymoog. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moopoly01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

Synthmuseum.com – Polymoog Keyboard. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moopolykbd01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

PRODIGY:

Harmony Central – Moog Prodigy. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Prodigy-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Intermusic.com – Moog Prodigy. Available from http://www.intermusic.com/article.asp?ReviewId=501&SubCat=17&ArticleTable=Reviews&Channel=KBD. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers a review of the Moog Prodigy, including a rating out of 5 and a picture.

Moog Prodigy. Available from http://aquabluemusic.users.btopenworld.com/prodigy/index.html. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers information about the Moog Prodigy. There are pictures, specs, a list of famous users, and a registration of current Prodigy owners.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Prodigy Synthesizer. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moogprodigy.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synhouse. Available from http://www.synhouse.com/prodigy1.html. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website focuses on adding MIDI capability to the Moog Prodigy with the Synhouse MIDIJACK. Detailed instructions and diagrams are provided.

Synthmuseum.com – Moog Prodigy. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/mooprodigy01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

ROGUE:

Harmony Central – Moog Rogue. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Rogue-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> The Rogue Synthesizer. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moogtherogue.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Moog Rogue. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moorog01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

SANCTUARY:

Synthmuseum.com – Moog Sanctuary. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moosanct01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

SATELLITE:

Harmony Central – Moog Satellite. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Satellite-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Satellite. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_satellite.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Moog Satellite. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moosat01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

SONIC SIX:

Harmony Central – Moog Sonic Six. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Sonic-Six-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Sonic Six. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_sonicsix.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Sonic Six. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moosonic601.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

SOURCE:

Harmony Central – Moog Source. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Source-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Harmony Central – Moog Source MIDI Retrofit. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Source-MIDI-Retrofit-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> The Source. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_source.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Moog Source. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/moosource01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

TAURUS:

Harmony Central – Moog Taurus. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Taurus-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Harmony Central – Moog Taurus 1. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Taurus-1-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Harmony Central – Moog Taurus 2. Available from http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Moog/Taurus-2-01.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

MOOG Taurus Appreciation Society, The. Available from http://web.archive.org/web/19990220121817/umbc7.umbc.edu/~rous/taurus.html. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website, which focuses on the Moog Taurus, offers information in the form or answers to potential consumer questions. Topics include distinctions between various models of the Taurus and tips when buying one second hand.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Moog Taurus II Bass Pedals. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moogtaurusii.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Sonicstate.com – Synth Site >> Moog >> Taurus 1 Bass Pedals. Available from http://www.sonicstate.com/synth/moog_taurus1.cfm. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Synthmuseum.com – Moog Taurus. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/moog/mootau01.html. Accessed 6 December 2002

THEREMIN:

Darrer, Ivor, and Bart Hopkin. “Still Nothing Else Like It: The Theremin.” Experimental Musical Instruments 8, no. 3 (1993): 22-26.

This is a technical, historical, and performance guide to the theremin, which Mr. Moog manufactured in the 1950s. [RILM: 93-10412-ap]

Rockmore, Clara, Nadia Reisenberg, and William Olsen, et al. Clara Rockmore the Greatest Theremin Virtuosa. Edited by William Olsen. 59 min. Big Briar, 1998. Videocassette.

This VHS production includes theremin performances by Clara Rockmore and discussions with performers, and a discussion with Robert Moog. [OCLC: 45230976]

* corporate annotations:

Harmony Central

These webpages include user reviews of Moog synthesizers in the form of verbal comments and ratings (out of 10; by each reviewer and the combined average) in the following areas: ease of use, features, expressiveness/sounds, reliability, customer support, and overall rating. The names of some reviewers are included, as are some of the prices paid for the instruments in question. The number of reviews for each instrument ranges from 1 to 13. Some reviews include helpful comments that are instructive to the scholar or potential customer while others are less succinct.

Sonicstate.com

These webpages offer reviews of many Moog synthesizers, including a verbal review, year of release, an evaluation of the instrument’s sounds in 15 categories, a listing of and connection to current used machines for sale, a recent history of online sales, and an average price of recent sales. Each linked advertisement includes comments supplied by the current owner indicating their machine’s condition and features. The main page also includes a link to a page with the instrument’s specifications (synthesis type; available polyphony; # of oscillators; controllers; keyboard; inputs and outputs; and upgrade options.) This information is useful for the scholar and potential customer. The number of reviewers for each instrument varies from 2 to 63.

Synthmuseum.com

These webpages offer succinct and helpful verbal reviews of many Moog synthesizers, including pictures, manufacturing information, year of release, technical information, a description of the instrument’s features and shortcomings, and a list of famous performers who used the instruments.

General and Custom Synthesizers

Chadabe, Joel. “Das Elektronische Studio von Albany.” Melos 38, no. 5 (1971): 188-90.

This article describes a custom built synthesizer Mr. Moog made for the electronic music studio at the State University of New York in Albany. [RILM: 71-03041-ap]

Synthfool. Available from http://www.synthfool.com/. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers pictures, original brochures, price lists, patch sheets, schematics, and parts for sale for a wide variety of synthesizers, including many Moog instruments.

Synthmuseum.com – An Interview with Dr. Joseph Paradiso. Available from http://www.synthmuseum.com/jp/index.html. Accessed 4 December 2002.

Dr. Joseph Paradiso, the owner and builder of a large and complex modular synthesizer, discusses the history and specs of his instrument along with a host of related synthesizer topics in this interview with Synthmuseum.com. Moog synthesizers form a portion of this super-synth. The webpage includes pictures, technical information, Dr. Paradiso’s guide to combining synthesizers into a compound instrument, speculative comments about the future of synthesizer design and use, and a practical look at the Moog synthesizers as compared to other synths of different makers and decades. Separate linked webpages take a specific look at the functions of this super-system’s Moog Minimoog, Satellite, and Concertmate MG-1.

Using the Moog Synthesizer. Available from http://arts.ucsc.edu/ems/music/equipment/synthesizers/analog/moog/Moog.html. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers technical information with a number of diagrams that would be helpful to a person connecting Moog synthesizers to each other or to other components. 9 specific parts are discussed, including voltage controlled oscillators, a voltage controlled amplifier, an envelope generator, voltage controlled filters, a filter coupler, a filter bank, and a sequencer.

Miscellaneous Resources

Hoskins, William. “Chameleon Scherzo: For Synthesizer and Orchestra.” Score. 1974. Jacksonville University Library, Jacksonville.

This musical score for synthesizer and orchestra is dedicated to Willis Page and Robert A. Moog, whom the composer thanks for making his composition possible. [OCLC: 30723414]

Moog Resources. Available from http://www.till.com/articles/moog/. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This is an excellent collection of links to online Moog resources and to a few published articles.

Synth Zone – Moog Resources. Available from http://www.synthzone.com/moog.htm. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers many helpful links to internet resources having to do with Robert Moog and Moog synthesizers.

Moog as Author

Bode, Harold, and Robert A. Moog. “The Multiplier-Type Ring Modulator.” Electronic Music Review no. 1 (1967): 9-15.

This article discusses the theory and function of the multiplier-type ring modulator, highlighting its ability to change input sounds into significantly changed tones. [RILM: 67-00425-ap]

Hopkin, Bart. Orbitones, Spoon Harps & Bellowphones. With a foreword by Robert Moog. Roslyn, NY: Ellipsis Arts, 1998.

Robert Moog provides a foreword to this combination of book and sound disc that contains contributions by Tom Waits and John Cage. Bart Hopkin wrote the book and produced the recording. [OCLC: 40694608]

Hopkin, Bart. Orbitones, Spoon Harps & Bellowphones: Experimental Musical Instruments. With an introduction by Robert Moog. Roslyn, NY: Ellipsis Arts, 1998.

No abstract was available for this book or the introduction. A computer disk accompanies the book. [RILM: 98-14111-bm] [Presumably, these two Hopkin citations refer to the same publication, but the difference in the listed titles does not rule out the possibility of two separate publications.]

Kramer, Gregory, and Robert A Moog. “The Hybrid: A Music Performance System.” In Proceedings: 1989 International Computer Music Conference, ed. Peter Desain, 155-59. San Francisco: Computer Music Association, 1989.

This article explores an experiment in developing an electronic musical instrument capable of reflecting the physical state and emotional mood of the performer. [RILM: 90-08093-as; symposium record – RILM: 90-01087-bs]

Mattis, Olivia, and Robert A Moog. “Leon Theremin: Pulling Music Out of Thin Air.” Keyboard 18, no. 2 (1992): 46-54.

This article explores the life of Lev Sergeevic Theremin, inventor of the first practical electronic musical instrument. [RILM: 92-06190-ap]

Moog, Bob. Synthesizers and Computers. Milwaukee: H. Leonard Pub. Corp., 1985.

This 129 page book, including contributions by others, covers such topics as computer music (instruction and study), synthesizers, and MIDI. [OCLC: 12949592]

Moog, Robert A. “An Objective Look as Electronic Music Equipment.” In American Society of University Composers: Proceedings of the Annual Conference, vol. 4, ed. Elaine Radoff Barkin, 32-35. New York, 1969.

This article deals with practical issues facing performers using electronic instruments, such as user interface, pre-programming, sequencing, and digital interface. [RILM: 98-16509-as; symposium record – RILM: 98-01265-bs]

Moog, Robert A. “Construction of a Simple Mixer.” Electronic Music Review no. 4 (1967): 37-38.

In this article, Robert Moog gives detailed technical information about a simple audio mixer. A schematic diagram and a list of parts are provided. [RILM: 67-02268-ap]

Moog, Robert A. “Digital Music Synthesis.” Byte 11, no. 6 (1986): 155-56.

Robert Moog discusses electronic sound generation, computer applications, and digital synthesis in this short article. [RILM: 89-08532-ap]

Moog, Robert A. “Introduction to Mixers and Level Controls.” Electronic Music Review no. 4 (1967): 10-13.

This article serves as an introduction to terms, functions, and the operation of mixers and level controls. [RILM: 67-02269-ap]

Moog, Robert A. “Introduction to Programmed Control.” Electronic Music Review no. 1 (1967): 23-32.

This article explores techniques of programmed control – reducing the amount of wasted time by sharpened use of pre-recording time in the generation of electronic music. Discussions of sequencers, punched paper tape readers, hybrid analogue/digital systems, and computers with analogue converters are included. [RILM: 67-00429-ap]

Moog, Robert A. “Position and Force Sensors and Their Applications to Keyboards and Related Control Devices.” In Music and Digital Technology, ed. John Strawn, 173-81. New York: Audio Engineering Society, 1987.

This article describes three keyboard controllers that can be used to affect musical parameters while playing, using three popular keyboards as examples. [RILM: 89-08533-as; John Strawn is listed as the author of Music and Digital Technology, but there must be an error in entry – he’s an editor, not a contributing writer; symposium record – RILM: 89-01256-bs]

Moog, Robert A. Review of Computer Applications in Music: A Bibliography, by Deta Davis. Journal of the Audio Engineering Society 37 (1989): 645.

This book review is of a reference book that deals with computer applications that relate to music. [Moog’s review – RILM: 89-00522-rb; reviewed book – RILM: 88-00522-bm]

Moog, Robert A. “The Musician: Alive and Well in the World of Electronics.” In The Biology of Music Making: Proceedings of the 1984 Denver Conference, ed. Franz L. Roehmann, 214-20. St. Louis: MMB Music, 1988.

This article explores issues surrounding the relationship of electronic instruments, musicians, and musicianship. [RILM: 91-04978-as; symposium – RILM: 91-01067-bs]

Moog, Robert. A. “Voltage-Controlled Electronic Music Modules.” Journal of the Audio Engineering Society 13, no. 3 (1965): 200-206.

No abstract was available for this article. [Taken from the Moog page at www.synthmuseum.com]

Moog, Robert A., and Thomas L. Rhea. “Evolution of the Keyboard Interface: The Bosendorfer 290 SE Recording Piano and the Moog Multiply-Touch-Sensitive Keyboard.” Computer Music Journal 14, no. 2 (1990): 52-60.

This article includes technical information about the keyboard interface systems used on the two named instruments, showing advantages over pre-existent technology. [RILM: 90-08096-ap]

Other Productions Involving Moog as Contributor

Olsen, William, and Lydia Kavina. Mastering the Theremin. Produced and directed by William Olsen. 45 min. Big Briar, 1995. Videocassette.

Bob Moog is the presenter in this video. The video is designed to help performers increase their proficiency in theremin performance. It includes 6 lessons covering such topics as hand movements, finger position, and other playing techniques. [OCLC: 34535778]

Shapiro, Peter, and Lara Lee. Modulations: A History of Electronic Music: Throbbing Words on Sound. New York: Caipirinha Productions, 2000.

Robert Moog is interviewed in this 255 page book which covers a wide range of topics relating to the history of electronic music such as disco, post-punk, hip-hop, techno, and jazz-funk. [OCLC: 45218394]

Recordings Involving Moog as Musician, Composer, Liner-Note-Writer, or Contributor

Gross, Terry, and Bob Moog. Fresh Air with Terry Gross, 2-28-00. Terry Gross and Robert Moog. Broadcast on National Public Radio Feb. 28, 2000. Cassette.

In this radio interview, Mr. Moog discusses his inventions and their influence on classical and popular music. He also talks about the theremin. [OCLC: 45425019]

Hopkin, Bart. Gravikords, Whirlies & Pyrophones: Experimental Musical Instruments. Roslyn, NY: Ellipsis Arts, 1998.

This book about avant-garde music and unusual instruments includes a sound recording with a track titled In the Beginning: Etude II by Don Buchla and Robert Moog. It was previously released in 1996. [OCLC: 48366506; this OCLC record misspells Pyrophones as Pyrohones]

Pennsylvania Public Radio Associates. Totally Wired. Otto Luening, Wendy Carlos, and Vangelis, et al. Pennsylvania Public Radio Associates, 1983-85. Cassette.

This collection of material relating to electronic music contains musical samples and spoken word, including a track titled The Technological Artists by Robert Moog and Donald Buchla. This is a 20 cassette publication containing contributions by such people as Karlheinz Stockhausen, Philip Glass, Chick Corea, Josef Zawinul, and Oscar Peterson. A 13 cassette version of this presentation by the same title, missing a few of the items included in 1985, was released in 1983. [OCLC: 13774051; 13 cassette version – OCLC: 13636406]

Pennsylvania Public Radio Associates. Totally Wired Artists in Electronic Sound. Otto Luening, Wendy Carlos, and Vangelis, et al. Pennsylvania Public Radio Associates, 1983-85. Cassette.

This collection of a slightly different title is a 16 cassette version of Totally Wired, listed above. [OCLC: 15527804]

Recordings Otherwise Involving Moog

Rockmore, Clara, Nadia Reisenberg, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Shirleigh and Robert Moog Present Clara Rockmore, Theremin. Clara Rockmore and Nadia Reisenberg. Delos D/QA-25437, 1981. LP.

This sound recording features arrangements of pieces by Rachmaninoff, Saint-Saens, De Falla, Achron, Wienawski, Stravinsky, Ravel, Tschaikowsky, and Glazunoz for theremin and piano. [OCLC: 38536637]

Zambonis. More Songs About Hockey — And Buildings and Food. Zambonis. Tarquin Records TQ-023, 1999. CD.

This is a rock sound recording that uses the name of Robert Moog in of the song titles. [OCLC: 43392045]

Recordings Using Moog Instruments

Bach, Johann Sebastian. Switched-On Bach. Wendy Carlos and Benjamin Folkman. Columbia MS 7194, 1968. LP.

This sound recording features the music of Bach performed on Moog synthesizers. Robert Moog contributes to the liner notes. [OCLC: 966189]

Bach, Johann Sebastian, Wendy Carlos, and Benjamin Folkman. Switched-On Bach Virtuoso Electronic Performances of J.S. Bach. Wendy Carlos. East Side Digital ESD81602, 2001. CD.

This sound recording includes previously released arrangements of the music of J.S. Bach. Robert Moog contributes to the liner notes. [OCLC: 48436681]

Big Ass Truck. Kent. Big Ass Truck. Upstart CD 027, 1995. CD.

This sound recording of rock music includes sounds made by Moog synthesizers. [OCLC: 36108479]

Byrne, Bobby. Shades of Brass. Dick Hyman, Walter Levinsky, and Richard Lieb, et al. Evolution 3003, 1970s. LP.

This sound recording features arrangements of popular songs such as Feeling’ Groovey and Respect for brass ensemble and Moog synthesizer. [OCLC: 38524464]

Caldara, Antonio, and John Atkins. Stabat Mater [A Moog Mass]. Robert White, Malcom Cecil, and John Atkins, et al. Kama Sutra KSBS 2020, 1970. LP.

This sound recording features music of Antonio Caldara performed by tenor solo, spoken voice, violincello, harpsichord, and Moog synthesizer. [OCLC: 12486571]

Carlos, Wendy, Rachel Elkind, and Benjamin Folkman, et al. Switched-On Boxed Set. Wendy Carlos. East Side Digital ESD 81422, 1999. CD.

This is a collection of 4 cds including the music of Bach, Monteverdi, Scarlatti, and Handel arranged for Moog synthesizer. Robert Moog contributes to the liner notes. [OCLC: 43148422]

Charles, Chili. Quickstep. Jazz Ensemble and Chili Charles. Virgin V 2028, 1975. LP.

This jazz recording features Chili Charles on drums, vocals, and Moog synthesizer. [OCLC: 16919308]

Columbia Musical Treasury. The Best-Loved Music of Christmas. Percy Faith, The New Christy Minstrels, and Robert Goulet, et al. Columbia House P2S 5622, 1972. LP.

This collection of Christmas carols by various artists includes a recording of Jingle Bells by a group called “Moog Machine”. [OCLC: 27853488]

Columbia Records, Inc. Happy Holidays from Columbia Records. Ray Conniff, Jerry Vale, and Percy Faith, et al. Columbia DJS 30, 1960s. LP.

This collection of Christmas carols by numerous performers includes a recording of Jingle Bells arranged by Alan Foust and performed by a group called “The Moog Machine.” [OCLC: 34685925] [This arrangement is likely the same as the arrangement on The Best-Loved Music of Christmas, listed above.]

Crevice. Caged Meat. Crevice. Get Happy Records LONG 02, 2000. CD.

This avant-garde sound recording includes the sounds of a Moog synthesizer. [OCLC: 49571332]

Crumb, George, Joan Wall, and Ellis Merrill, et al. Echoes of Time and the River: Echoes II. Joan Wall, Merrill Ellis, Louisville Orchestra, et al. Louisville Orchestra, 1971. LP.

The second work on this orchestral recording features a Moog synthesizer, played by Merrill Ellis. [OCLC: 9846970]

Davis, Miles. The Man with the Horn. Miles Davis, Randy Hall, and Robert Irving. Columbia FC 36790, 1981. LP.

This jazz recording, 53 minutes in duration, features Randy Hall playing a Moog synthesizer. [OCLC: 19292872]

Denny, Martin, Al Caiola, and Julie London, et al. Ultra-Lounge. Volume Eighteen, Bottoms Up. Denny Martin, Al Cailoa, and Julie London, et al. Capitol CDP 7243 9 53412 2 9, 1997. CD.

This sound recording features a “Moog version” of Quiet Village, performed by Martin Denny. There is also a recorded version of Henry Mancini’s Baby Elephant Walk. [OCLC: 37252979]

Deodato, Eumir. Very Together. Eumir Deodato. MCA Records MCA-2219, 1976. LP.

The multi-talented Eumir Deodato’s sound recording features, among other instruments, a Mini-Moog bass. [OCLC: 4865043]

Droste, Keith. Big Band Moog. Keith Droste, Bob Surga, and John Frigo, et al. Realistic 50-2022, 1970s. LP.

This sound recording contains arrangements of popular songs for the Moog synthesizer and Big Band. [OCLC: 50633581]

Duncan, Bryan. Blue Skies. Bryan Duncan, Tim Pierce, Alan Pasqua, et al. Word EK 67932, 1996. CD.

This contemporary Christian music sound recording that uses a Mini-Moog bass, played by James Raymond. [OCLC: 36844514]

Earland, Charles, Melvin Sparks, and Boogaloo Joe Jones, et al. Charlie’s Greatest Hits. Charles Earland, Melvin Sparks, and Boogaloo Joe Jones, et al. Prestige Records PRCD-24250-2, 2000. CD.

Numerous instruments and performers are heard on this soul-jazz sound recording, including Dr. Patrick Gleeson playing Moog synthesizers. The release of this album in 2000 follows the original release on vinyl in 1969. [OCLC: 47207395]

Ehle, Robert C., Vit Micka, and James David Robertson, et al. Symphonies. Olomouc Symphony Orchestra, Brno Choir, and Vit Micka, et al. 1900s. CD.

This sound recording of various musical styles involves many performers from the University of Northern Colorado, including Robert Ehle playing a Moog synthesizer. No publisher is listed on the OCLC record. [OCLC: 50195866]

Ellis, Merrill, Joan Wall, and Jorge Mester. Kaleidoscope for Orchestra, Synthesizer, and Soprano. Louisville Orchestra, Joan Wall, and Jorge Mester. Louisville Orchestra, 1971. LP.

This sound recording involves a Moog synthesizer combined with orchestra and soprano solo. [OCLC: 916602]

Foster, Ronnie, Ray Armando, and John E. Gatchell, et al. On the Avenue. Ronnie Foster, Ray Armando, and John E. Gatchell, et al. Blue Note BN-LA 261G, 1974. LP.

Ronnie Foster plays a Moog synthesizer on this jazz sound recording. [OCLC: 19116372]

Galactic. We Love ‘Em Tonight Live at Tipitina’s. Galactic. Volcano 61422-32183-2, 2001. CD.

This live jazz recording includes a song titled Moog Marmalade. [OCLC: 47849909]

Hot Butter, Perrer-Kingsley, and Jean Jacques Perrey, et al. Best of Moog Electronic Pop Hits from the 60’s & 70’s. Hot Butter, Perry-Kinsley, and Jean Jacques Perrey, et al. Loud Records 1792-2, 1999. CD.

This is a retrospective sound recording featuring many performers and works that use Moog synthesizers, including such songs as Foggy Mountain Breakdown, I Apologize Mr. Rossini, Baroque Hoedown, and Moog Power. One of the groups performing is called “First Moog Quartet.”. [OCLC: 45358545]

Houston, Cissy. Think it Over. Cissy Houston, Alan Schwartzberg, and Francisco Centeno, et al. Private Stock Records PS 7015. LP.

This popular music sound recording includes the sounds of a Moog synthesizer. [OCLC: 25086963]

Jenkins, Leroy, Andrew Cyrille, and Anthony Davis, et al. Space Minds, New Worlds, Survival of America. Leroy Jenkins, Andrew Cyrille, and Anthony Dave, et al. Tomato 2696512, 1989. CD.

This jazz sound recording features Moog synthesizers, played by Richard Teitelbaum. It was originally released in 1979 on LP. [OCLC: 25227069]

Kelley, Peter. Dealin’ Blues. Peter Kelly, Jack “Killer Bass” Nailon, and Lynas, et al. Sire SI 4903, 1971. LP.

Peter Kelley’s group of accompanying instruments on this sound recording includes a Moog synthesizer. [OCLC: 39035598]

Lockwood, Annea, Mary Buchen, and Bill Buchen, et al. Sources. Annea Lockwood, Mary Buchen, and Bill Buchen, et al. Nonsequitur Foundation, 1990. Cassette.

This sound recording features a combination of spoken word and sounds, covering such topics as sounds, new contexts of musical expression, sound sculpture, audio environments, and audio ecology. The title of one track is Mozart’s Moog, presented by Jim Pomeroy. [OCLC: 26529615]

Mackenzie, R. J., Rick Powell, and Imogene Forte. Kid’s Stuff Experiences in Creating, Composing, and Interpreting Songs, Stories, Poems, Drama, Rhythm, and Body Movement. R. J. Mackenzie, Rick Powell, and Imogene Forte. Incentive Publications IP 101, 1972. LP.

This sound recording features a sonic texture combining narrator, orchestra, children’s chorus, and a Moog Synthesizer. [OCLC: 18400548]

Martsch, Doug. Perfect From Now On. Built to Spill. Warner Brothers 9 46453-2, 1997. CD.

This rock sound recording includes the sounds of a Moog synthesizer. It is also available on an audio cassette, which is handy in some cars. [OCLC: 36381898]

McGuinn, Roger, David Crosby, and Bob Dylan, et al. Roger McGuinn. Roger McGuinn, David Crosby, and Bob Dylan, et al. Columbia KC 31946, 1973. LP.

Roger McGuinn plays a Moog synthesizer on this rock and folk-rock sound recording. [OCLC: 19581245]

Placebo. Placebo. Brian Molko, Stefan Olsdal, and Robert Schultzberg. Virgin Records CAR 7575, 1996. CD.

Placebo used a Moog synthesizer when making this sound recording. [OCLC: 38063628]

Rameau, Jean Philippe, and Bob James. Rameau. Bob James. CBS Records MK 39540, 1984. CD.

Bob James plays the harpsichord music of J. P. Rameau on a number of synthesizers, including a Mini-Moog, on this recording. [OCLC: 11833567]

Randall, Elliot, Bob Piazza, and Allen Herman, et al. Randall’s Island. Elliot Randall, Bob Piazza, and Allen Herman, et al. Polydor 24-4044, 1970. LP.

This sound recording features rock and jazz fusion, primarily using guitars. One of the supporting instruments is a Moog Synthesizer. [OCLC: 44613126]

Rockmore, Clara, Nadia Reisenberg, and Sergei Rachmaninoff, et al. The Art of the Theremin. Delos D/CD 1014, 1987. CD.

This sound recording includes arrangements for theremin of waltzes by a number of composers including Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, and Tchaikovsky. [OCLC: 18408837; 34882722]

Scott-Herin, Gil. From South Africa to South Carolina. Gil Scott-Herin, Brian Jackson, and Bob Adams, et al. Rumal-Gia Records/TVT Classics TVT 4340-2, 1998. CD.

This jazzy sound recording uses a Moog synthesizer on track 9. [OCLC: 39705376]

Sky Cries Mary. This Timeless Turning. Sky Cries Mary. World Domination Music Group WD0018-2, 1994. CD.

This rock music sound recording includes a Moog Taurus bass. [OCLC: 32502902]

Summers, Andy, and Robert Fripp. I Advance Masked. Andy Summers and Robert Fripp. A & M Records, 75021 4913 2, 1982. CD.

This sound recording includes a Moog synthesizer together with a variety of rock instruments. [OCLC: 9055366]

Sun Ra, John Gilmore, and Pat Patrick, et al. Live at Montreux. Sun Ra, John Gilmore, and Pat Partick, et al. Inner City IC 1039-2, 1978. LP.

This jazz sound recording was recorded live at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1976 and uses a Moog synthesizer, played by Sun Ra. [OCLC: 5470620]

Sussman, Richard, Andy LaVerne, and Bob Moses. Tributaries. Richard Sussman, Andy LaVerne, and Bob Moses. Inner City IC 1068, 1980. LP.

Many synthesizers and electronic keyboards are heard on this sound recording, including the Moog Mini-Moog. [OCLC: 26763730]

To Rococo Rot. To Rococo Rot. To Rococo Rot. Kitty-Yo efa 55201-2, 1996. CD.

Numerous synthesizers, including a Moog Satellite, were used in this self titled rock sound recording. [OCLC: 45104293]

Sales, Repair, Upgrades, and Maintenance of Moog Products

Analog.no. Available from http://analog.no/. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers downloadable Moog patches and envelopes.

Archive Sound. Available from http://pw2.netcom.com/~arcsound/. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers repair kits for a variety of older synthesizers, including some Moog models.

FM Music. Available from http://www.madbbs.com/~fmcniff/. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This website offers parts and manuals for sale for a variety of Moog synthesizers. Pictures are included in the parts section.

Moog Music. Available from http://www.moogmusic.com/. Accessed 5 December 2002.

This is Robert Moog’s own site, including information about products for sale, customer support, dealer information, pictures, and an explanation of the change of company name from Big Briar, Inc. to Moog Music Inc.

Moog Music Custom Engineering. Available from http://moogce.com/news.htm. Accessed 5 December 2002.

The mission of this site is to provide customers with authentic Moog products, manuals, parts, and technical expertise. The most helpful features of this site are the list of available parts (with prices) and the information request form for a variety of potential customer needs.

Beyond Silver

Beyond Silver is an emerging success story, offering access to the industry-leading structured silver technology through retail outlets.  Structured silver is the new form of silver that outperforms older silver technologies such as colloidal silver, ionic silver, and silver hydrosol.

Beyond SilverBeyond Silver comes in two forms: a liquid for internal consumption and a gel for topical application.

The liquid has 10 parts-per-million of silver, yet outperforms earlier silver technologies even when they have a much higher concentration of silver. The benefit is that extremely effective action against bacteria, viruses and yeast is possible with almost no silver present.

The gel has 25 parts-per-million of silver, but also contains a high-end form of aloe vera for extra benefit to the skin. Known as BiAloe, this certified organic aloe has many advantages over other forms of aloe vera. Within the Beyond Silver gel, it forms an ideal partnership with the structured silver to quickly disinfect and sooth skin.

Beyond Silver has achieved positive reviews, including being named to Vista Magazine’s 2015 Editor’s Favourite Things.

The trick to using structured silver is to get it to the right place in or on the body: wherever bacteria, viruses, or yeast may be causing trouble. Once the silver can contact the pathogen, it can neutralize the problem and let the body get back to normal function of replacing damaged cells one at a time over the following weeks.

Many times, swallowing two teaspoons twice a day is a good way to keep Beyond Silver in the body for general immune support. However, Beyond Silver can also be applied directly into the eyes, ears, nose, skin, or any other part of the body. There are many suggestions for delivering silver to various body regions listed here.

I have used Beyond Silver and can report very quick results when taken as directed. It really delivers.

Beyond Silver is available in leading health food stores. More information is online here: Beyond Silver Official Website.

Here is someone else’s experience with Beyond Silver.

Realistic Mach One – 4024, 4024a, 4029

Way back in the late 1970’s, Realistic produced some of the most iconic speakers in stereo history. They had their faults, but boy did these puppies rock. Their look with the grills off is hard to forget and they shake walls if connected to the right amp. Only a fool would trade today’s best speakers for these Titans of a bygone age, but many collectors have a pair in the basement hooked up to a volcano of a power amp so that once in a while they can make the house rumble like it’s 1979 all over again.

Much has changed in speaker technology over the years. Loudspeaker research in the 80s rewrote the textbook on cabinet design. Materials have shifted from wood and paper products to polymer composites. 2.1, 5.1, and newer surround audio-visual systems have largely replaced the “2 big boxes” approach to home audio. Yet, despite these changes, you can still find informed people who sincerely believe that the Mach One’s are just as good as today’s best new equipment.

This post won’t argue past vs present, but let it be known: there’s a pair of Mach Ones in the basement. 🙂

Realistic Mach One 4024a

Young and foolish in the 90s…

Why People Love These Speakers

Two reasons: the look and the sound.

In the age of full-spectrum stereo speaker boxes, the “15 inch” woofer brought lots of low end while two horns (mid & high range) brought a clean upper end. Two large dials allowed for adjustment of the mid & high range volume +/- 6 decibels.

Realistic Mach One Dials

The speakers sounded best with a high-powered amp running at mid or higher volume. All speakers are balanced to sound best at a given volume (for example, studio monitors vs. concert stacks) and these sound right when turned up. They sound okay at lower volumes, but are really nothing special when heard quietly. Turned up, however, they pour out a wonderful sound.

Speaker placement is important with these boxes. I’ve set up Mach Ones in several dozen rooms and they sound best in a large room with at least 15 feet of distance between the grills and the listener, preferably more. The sound also changes dramatically if they are on the floor, raised, angled, in a corner, upside down, on their sides, etc. I’ve never discovered a rule of thumb that works in every room, but when placing 4024a’s in a new room I usually start like this:

  • raised 10-15 inches off the floor
  • as much room between them and me as possible
  • close to the room’s corners, but not right in them
  • angled ~35 degrees off the back wall towards center
  • not pointing directly at the listening spot (off-axis perhaps 30 degrees, or the horns “blare” too much)
  • grills off, naturally…

I also generously EQ at or before the amp towards bass heaviness. On a multi-band EQ, everything below 50 Hz is boosted a lot. These boxes can deliver heavy bass, but not without EQ support and a high powered amp. Without EQ or if you’re using a low-powered amp, the sound from these boxes are quite disappointing.

Officially they sound down to 20 Hz, depending on your information source. While this is true, the response is nowhere near flat. With EQ support, this problem largely disappears. Unlike many newer speakers that simply do not sound below 35-40 Hz, the Mach Ones can give nearly full-spectrum sound in one box with a little signal modification.

As for the look of these speakers, people either love gratuitous woofer or they don’t. There is little middle ground. To my eyes, there is no finer looking speaker in the era.

Models Compared – 4024, 4024a, 4029

There is debate about which models were the best, but here’s the quick rundown on the three models of Mach Ones released by Realistic:

  1. 4024 – Originals, made by Tandy in 1977. Woofer has rubber surround that doesn’t rot (originals are still great in 2014). L-plate on the front uses 10 screws. Came with a lifetime warranty.
  2. 4024a – Same as the 4024, except made from 1978-81. Came with a 5-year warranty.
  3. 4029 – “Junk” according to 4024/4024a purists. Made by Optimus from 1982 to 1984. Uses different components. Woofer has a foam surround that needs replacement. L-plate on the front uses 6 screws. The “VL mods” (see “Modifications” below) only apply to this model. The resale on the 4029s is lower than 4024/4024a, and most people say that the 4029s do not sound as good as the original 4024/4024a speakers.

Basic Specifications

Impedance: 8 ohms
Response: 20-25000 Hz (no +/- db listed; sometimes “25-22000 Hz”)
Crossovers: 1200, 4500 Hz
Speakers: 15″, horn, horn
Peak: 160W
Weight: 65 lbs
Dimensions: 28-5/8″ H x 17-3/8″W x 12″ D
Original price: $400/pair (1977)

How Good Are They, Really?

I don’t listen to mine regularly, but I’ll never throw them out. How’s that for an answer?

The critics call them boomy, harsh, muddy, and generally overrated. It really depends on what they’re being compared against, what room you’re filling with sound, the amp, and the volume level. In some settings they are pure gold, while in others they’re just heavy obsolete museum pieces.

Some music where they shine includes organ music, bombastic symphonic music, and loud rock like Back in Black, Wayward Son, or the 1976 Boston album.

Compared to today’s full-spectrum high-end speakers, the Mach Ones sound slow and imbalanced. However, compared to many of today’s mid-range speakers, white van speakers, computer speakers, or speakers with bass that disappears around 40 Hz, the Mach Ones are still a good option.

Original Description

This is how Realistic described these speakers when originally released.

Realistic Mach One. The first under-$400 home speaker system with the power capacity to easily handle 100-watt musical surges and the ability to reproduce them with awesome realism. The powerful heavy-magnet 15” woofer moves such massive volumes of air you can feel the bass. The 4-cell midrange horn adds presence for that “live sound,” and its wide dispersion angle assures a good spatial image in stereo systems. The tweeter horn delivers highs so well defined they seem to hang in the air with a bell-like clarity. And a special L-C crossover network blends all speaker elements for a response free of of peaks and valleys. To prevent treble attenuation, the grill cloth is almost “acoustically transparent.” Once you’ve heard the soundtrack from a film like “Tommy” or “2001, A Space Odyssey” on the Mach One, we don’t think you’ll ever settle for a lesser speaker – especially if it costs more! 20-25,000 Hz response, 8 ohms impedance. Genuine walnut veneer finish.

Modifications / Updates

An Audiokarma.org user named “videolady201” has developed a set of upgrades for the 4029s that are ideal for hobbyists who like tinkering. Basically, the modifications flatten the response and clean up the sound. This is accomplished by drilling inside the cabinet to give the woofer cavity additional space and by altering the crossovers. I’ve never heard a pair with these modifications, but the reviewers rave.

For an introduction to the topic, see the Audiokarma thread here.

The PDF with detailed instructions, pictures, and test results is available here and here and here.

What Are They Worth?

Ultimately, they’re worth nothing if you don’t like cool speakers or don’t want 130 lbs of vintage thunder in your house.

As of 2015 in Canada, I’ve seen many pairs of 4024/4024a’s sell through online markets in the range of $300. If they’re in lousy cosmetic condition but still work, the price drops a little, but not much. The most expensive I’ve seen for “mint condition” Mach Ones where they actually sold (it wasn’t some nut way overcharging) was around $400.

If you ever find a pair at a garage sale for under $100 and they work, grab them RUN. Even if you don’t like them (…or your partner won’t let them into the house), you can likely recover your costs if you’re patient.

Other Realistic Speakers & Vintage Gear

I’ve owned several 1970s/80s Realistic components (amps, receivers, EQs, etc.) and was never excited about any of them. It’s not that they were junk, they were just fairly average. I’ve also owned a couple other pairs of Realistic speakers (Nova’s) and was thoroughly underwhelmed.

It’s possible that I didn’t fully appreciate this gear or that I didn’t put it in a setting to shine. However, I suspect it’s more likely that the 70s-80s Realistic team got lucky with the Mach Ones.

I’ve never had the pleasure of a side-by-side featuring Mach Ones with Realistic’s later models, the Mach Two or Mach 5000 speakers, so I can’t confirm or deny the popular opinion that Realistic Mach speakers went downhill after the 4024a Mach Ones. There are mixed reviews online, but I’d endure a home test if the opportunity arose. 🙂

Links Around the Interwebs

To start with, this may be the greatest quote about Realistic Mach Ones ever:

Mach One Quote

The full thread is here.

For more Mach One fun online, here are some fun places to start:

Realistic Mach One 15" Woofer

Colloidal Silver for Dogs

Dogs and humans have similar health needs.  As mammals, canines have many common characteristics and health challenges as their care-taking human friends.

Millions of people consider their dogs to be part of the family.  For that reason, canine health is a major concern.  While there are specialized health care options for animals ranging from advanced surgical procedures to any number of pharmaceutical drugs, there is also a natural solution for a broad array of dog health needs.  This solution is structured silver.

Structured silver is a next-generation colloidal silver technology that outperforms older colloidal silvers and silver hydrosols by wide margins. To learn exactly how structured silver is an improvement over the unstructured colloids of the past, go here.

Briefly, the colloids in colloidal silver are very small pieces silver held within water. New structuring techniques allow those silver particles to bond with the water in a way that the silver is much more active while still being safe. Here’s how this new version of colloidal silver works:

Avoiding trips to the vet and chronic infections can save you a lot of trouble and money. Vets are great resources, but using silver at home can help you prevent avoidable problems caused by infectious organisms.

Dog Use in General

•         Wash wounds with silver liquid
•         Apply silver gel to the wound and surrounding areas (this should be done 1-4 times a day as needed)
•         Wraps can be used to keep the gel in place longer
•         Dogs can drink the liquid silver for system benefits.  It is given in amounts proportionate to the body weight of the animal.  The average human weighs 150 pounds and drinks 2 teaspoons twice a day (maintenance dose).  Dogs receive a dose of silver liquid that is based on the weight of the animal in comparison to human doses. For example:

Human (150 lbs): two teaspoons, twice per day
Dog (15 lbs): two tenths of a teaspoon, twice per day
Dog (75 lbs): one teaspoon, twice per day

•         For more serious conditions the dose can be doubled, tripled or even quadrupled.
•         Gel can be given topically, orally and/or in every orifice of the body in doses that cover the wound or treat the orifice, usually twice a day, but it is safe enough to apply 5 or more times a day (which is rarely needed).
•         Silver gel is more expensive per ounce, but is safe enough to be consumed directly by the dog. If he or she licks an area where gel has been applied, that’s fine, just a little expensive.

For wounds in a visible area, it is recommended that the silver liquid and gel be given 60 days after total wound healing has been achieved to minimize scarring. For areas normally covered with fur, cosmetic concerns don’t apply and the main goal is to keep the area pathogen-free while the wound heals over and new skin grows.

The point of using silver liquid and gel is that the silver will destroy the bacteria, viruses, yeast and numerous parasites if the silver can stay in contact with the pathogen for 6 minutes.  When you apply the gel it is because it will stay in place longer than the liquid silver.  Both can completely kill the pathogen, but because the liquid silver is water-soluble it doesn’t pass through the skin or other fatty tissues easily.  In fact, it is because it cannot pass through lipids that it doesn’t kill the good probiotic bacteria in the gut: the lactobacillus is coated with a milk fat that prevents water-soluble silver penetration and spares the good bacteria.

Silver liquid or gel can be added to drinking water, pumped into the mouth of the dog, applied to any orifice, and is actually absorbed very well rectally and vaginally. For dogs that keep a tidy water bowl (low amounts of spilling/splashing), adding silver liquid to the water dish is the easiest option. The silver is odorless and nearly tasteless, so your dog won’t even know what’s in his/her water.

12 Reasons to Use Structured Silver (Next-Generation Colloidal Silver) for Your Dog

  1. Protects against pathogens: Colloidal silver has been shown to effectively eradicate a number of bacteria, viruses, and other microbes, many of which are found in dogs.
  2. Good forms of colloidal silver support the immune system.
  3. Reduces inflammation: Through its disinfectant power, structured silver can reduce infection and slow the inflammatory response in animals.
  4. Protects against many parasites.
  5. Provides pain relief: Structured silver effectively reduces swelling and infection, and therefore reduces the associated pain without the side effects of traditional medicines.
  6. Promotes oral health: Structured silver can help reduce tooth plaque and decay, and minimize bad breath.  It also is effective for mouth and jaw infections.
  7. Supports eye, ear and nose health: Structured silver is commonly applied to the eyes, ears, and nose for infections and other problems.
  8. Keeps skin and coats healthy: Structured silver can effectively fight skin infections and help maintain a healthy coat.
  9. Soothes wounds and burns: Can effectively heal wounds, scrapes, tears and burns.
  10. Calms digestive ailments: Structured silver can safely be consumed to help with ailments of the digestive tract, such as food poisoning, vomiting, diarrhea and intestinal infections.
  11. Disinfects pet surroundings: Structured silver is a terrific tool for disinfecting and cleaning your pet’s surroundings, including dog houses, food and water bowls, toys, and so forth.
  12. It is extremely SAFE: Dozens of studies, as well as thousands of anecdotal cases, have shown silver to be non-toxic and very safe for internal and external application.